News Archive

Another Pulitzer Project

What’s with the craze about the history of the Pulitzers? Earlier this year, I reported on publisher Patricia D’Ascoli’s plan to compile an anthology of reviews of the Pulitzer prize winners in fiction, including Tarkington’s The Magnificent Ambersons and Alice Adams. Then last month I wrote several times about “100 Years. 94 Books,” blogger Matt Kahn’s project to read and review every book to top the year’s best sellers list at Publisher’s Weekly since 1913… including Tarkington’s The Turmoil and Seventeen. Well, the “list” craze continues… and this time a bunch of award-winning poets are at it.


Seventeen Reviewed

Matt Kahn continues to blog about “100 Years. 94 Books.” His goal… to read and review every book to top the year’s best sellers list at Publisher’s Weekly since 1913. You can visit Kahn’s blog for a complete list of the 94 titles (some, like Gone With the Wind, topped the list in more than one year). This week he published his review of Seventeen (1916), the second of Tarkington’s two titles to top the PW list. His impressions are mixed.


The Turmoil Reviewed

I told you a couple weeks ago about Matt Kahn, who is blogging about “100 Years. 94 Books.” His goal is to read and review every book to top the year’s best sellers list at Publisher’s Weekly since 1913. You can visit Kahn’s blog for a complete list of the 94 titles (some, like Gone With the Wind, topped the list in more than one year). This week he published his review of The Turmoil (1915), the first of Tarkington’s two titles to top the PW list. His impressions are pretty favorable.


Tarkington, Best-Seller

“100 Years. 94 Books.” That’s the title of a new reviewing project by blogger Matt Kahn. The idea? To read and review every book to top the year’s best sellers list at Publisher’s Weekly since 1913. You can visit Kahn’s blog for a complete list of the 94 titles (some, like Gone With the Wind, topped the list in more than one year). Two Tarkington titles appear on the list: The Turmoil (1915) and Seventeen (1916), a rather impressive back-to-back accomplishment.


The Prescient Tarkington

A Deseret News reporter recently ran a story about the tendency of governments to forget about laws on the books, and then re-legislate what has already been legislated. The motivation for the article was the kickoff of new local and national legislative sessions. But the flashpoint connection was… an AC/DC concert in 1991 during which 3 people died. That part of the article is interesting enough, but what caught my eye was Jay Evanson’s invoking of a passage from The Turmoil in 1915.


Tark and the Pulitzers… and Me

Early in the fall, I was contacted by Patricia D’Ascoli, educator and publisher of the Connecticut Muse, about contributing reviews of to an anthology of Pulitzer prize winners in fiction. I submitted my mss at the end of December, and look forward to sharing the full text of those reviews on this site down the road. For now, D’Ascoli’s project is being shopped around to agents and publishers, so I’m expecting the book will likely be published sometime in 2014.


The Digital Woodress

One of the books in the Kansas City Public Library was, yes, the Woodress biography of Tarkington. Thanks to the government of India, you can now not only get a used copy of the original edition (I recommend abebooks.com), you can also get it as a Nook book, in a rather pricey paperback facsimile edition, or… browse it online for free! One catch… the Indian government apparently created a new title for the book. See if you can spot the difference.


Tarkington’s Epic Graduation Fail

When Princeton University fondly recalls Booth Tarkington’s ivied days as a member of the class of 1893, they consistently omit one little detail: he may have started out with the class of ‘93 upon matriculation, but he never actually finished. It’s possible that Tarkington may in fact be Princeton’s most famous dropout–sort of a 19th Century version of Bill Gates and Harvard.


Tarkington, Pillar of Georgia Street

Georgia Street was the center of “Super Bowl Village,” but something was apparently lacking once the big NFL event, lasting just a few days, was over. In what feels like a rebuilding-burnt-bridges move, the committee responsible for hosting the Super Bowl funded (among other projects) a series of seven-foot pillars along Georgia Street which commemorate Hoosiers of note.


Beasley in the Windy City

Gallery has made good choices in this staging, opting for six adult actors and one child. Several of the adults will still play multiple roles, but the production promises to be much less confusing than it was (gauging by the reviews) at Keen and Taproot in Manhattan and Seattle, respectively.


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